“Out To Meet” — May 2 in Palo Alto

We would like to invite you to Outlet’s next community event and fundraiser, Out to Meet, on Friday, May 2, 2014 from 6-8pm in Palo Alto! Out to Meet is a lively party in the spirit of Out More »

Outlet Services Expand with ACS!

It is with great excitement that I share wonderful news with you: Outlet has joined forces with Adolescent Counseling Services (ACS) in Palo Alto to expand our capacity to serve more LGBTQQ More »

The Definition of Equality? An Outlet Youth Response to the Marriage Equality Debate

The Definition of Equality? By Anna Livia Chen, Outlet Youth Advisory Council Member Here is the irony: as red and pink equals signs flood our Facebook newsfeeds, we have yet to concretely More »

Youth Spotlight: Rae

Rae had heard about Outlet, but didn’t come until a friend brought him along to Monday Night Group a year and a half ago. While he was nervous at his first meeting, More »

Out to Eat!

On Friday, May 3, 2013, supporters of Outlet gathered at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View to celebrate and fundraise for our work empowering LGBTQQ youth and educating the community. Exciting More »

 

“Out To Meet” — May 2 in Palo Alto

Save the date, May 2, 2014 "Out To Meet"
We would like to invite you to Outlet’s next community event and fundraiser, Out to Meet, on Friday, May 2, 2014 from 6-8pm in Palo Alto! Out to Meet is a lively party in the spirit of Out to Eat (and critical to our budget this fiscal year as we move Out to Eat to the fall!)Join us for our bite-sized soiree with over-sized opportunities to socialize and enjoy inspiring speakers from the Outlet program, delicious wine and hors d’oeuvres, an exciting raffle, and most important of all… a chance to support Outlet!
If you have any questions about the event, please feel free to contact me at anthony@acs-teens.org or call at 650.424.0852 ext 107.

To register: tinyurl.com/outtomeet

Hope to see you there! 

Out To Meet, May 2, 2014

Outlet Services Expand with ACS!

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It is with great excitement that I share wonderful news with you: Outlet has joined forces with Adolescent Counseling Services (ACS) in Palo Alto to expand our capacity to serve more LGBTQQ and ally youth!

As of July 1, 2013, Outlet became an official program of ACS, the community-based nonprofit agency dedicated to the healthy social and emotional development of teens in Northern Santa Clara County and San Mateo County. Last year, a transition committee was formed to investigate Outlet’s options, guide its direction in expanding services, and realize its mission to serve more LGBTQQ youth. Our deepest thanks go to Naomi Fine, Leonie Walker, Mark Loretan, Kevin Gardner, and consultant Paula Harris for their invaluable guidance and generosity of time to make this expansion a reality. The transition committee thoroughly examined a range of options, which included becoming an independent 501(c)(3) corporation, fiscal sponsorship, and acquisition by a larger 501(c)(3) organization. As an agency that is solely focused on services to adolescents and with plans to expand further into San Mateo County, ACS was by far the best fit for Outlet to serve more youth in communities where our services are greatly needed.

Of course, we are still Outlet! And we will continue to provide all the services we currently do by partnering with CHAC. Outlet youth who attend groups in Mountain View continue to do so – and now in a beautiful new building, with CHAC’s recent move to 590 West El Camino Real. We are incredibly grateful to CHAC for all of their support for the past ten years as they welcomed our programs back in 2003. As we began the critical and detailed work of strategic planning which included expansion, CHAC supported our efforts to expand up into South San Mateo County by joining ACS. As a program of ACS, Outlet continues to partner with CHAC by providing three groups on location, setting up office and staff on site, and offering trainings and consultation to the CHAC interns and staff, as well as all the schools and other organizations we have worked with these many years.

Outlet is a natural fit for Adolescent Counseling Services (ACS), which empowers teens and their families in our community to realize their emotional and social potential through counseling and preventive education. Established in 1975, ACS relies on the generosity of the community to offer critical interventions and mental health services to over 7,000 individuals annually, building a better future for tomorrow. ACS offers year-round services to San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties through its On-Campus Counseling Program, Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment Program, After-School Counseling Program, and, now, the Outlet Program!

If you would like to donate in support of Outlet’s exciting expansion, click here (or make a check out to ACS, with a note of “Outlet” in the memo; those funds will then be allocated directly to Outlet services. The mailing address and contact information is below). Please note, the Donate Now link is still operating through CHAC until we are able to build the new process using ACS’s bank.

I can’t overstate how truly powerful this integration with ACS is for Outlet. I only see possibility and opportunity working with the wonderful board and staff of ACS, – and continuing our partnership with CHAC. Outlet’s dream of reaching and supporting even more youth on the Peninsula is in full stride!

As always, thank you for your connection and support of Outlet, empowering LGBTQQ youth to take on the world. If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to contact me directly.

In Community,

 

Anthony Ross
Outlet Director
Adolescent Counseling Services (ACS)
 
Business address (for main information and donations):
Adolescent Counseling Services (ACS)
Outlet Program
1717 Embarcadero Road, Suite 4000
Palo Alto, CA 94303
Donations should be payable to ACS, with OUTLET on the Memo line.
650-424-0852 (P)
650-424-9853 (F)
http://www.projectoutlet.org/ 
http://www.acs-teens.org/ 
anthony@projectoutlet.org
 
CHAC’s new address (services only):
590 W. El Camino Real
Mountain View, CA 94041
650-965-2020 x122
www.chacmv.org

The Definition of Equality? An Outlet Youth Response to the Marriage Equality Debate

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The Definition of Equality?

By Anna Livia Chen, Outlet Youth Advisory Council Member

Here is the irony: as red and pink equals signs flood our Facebook newsfeeds, we have yet to concretely define what equality means. Equality under the law? Which laws? Social equality? How is that to be measured? The truth is that equality means something different to everyone—and that is what has caused such a polarizing tizzy within the queer community.

Let’s start with the dissenters of the red HRC logo—not those who simply don’t post it, but those who actively speak out against it. Most who have raised issues with the red logo are against it for one or both of the following reasons: to criticize the notion that marriage equality is the only aspect of queer rights—a conclusion that can be inferred from HRC and other organizations’ extreme focus on the marriage equality movement; or as an ideological refusal to endorse the Human Rights Campaign because of the many grievances it has committed, including its historical disregard of trans* people and trans* rights. Many of these folks argue that marriage rights are a white, middle-class, cis-gendered priority that does very little for youth, queer people of color, lower-class queers, and the trans* community. They seek greater examination of other issues like safe schools, job and housing security, and the extension of current marriage rights—such as immigration, hospital, and tax rights—to non-married couples. These practical rights that affect a wider range of queer people are their definition of equality.

Fierce advocates of marriage equality are fighting for the same cause—queer liberation. However, their definition of equality differs. They strive to have their love recognized in the most touted institution in our society, from Sunday church to Hollywood (even if celebrities get divorced 6 months later, their multi-million dollar wedding was still on the cover of all the tabloids). The marriage movement is the queer issue that has risen to prevalence in our society; it is the one that gay rights organizations focus on, and it is the one that allies most often rally behind when demonstrating their support. Why? Because marriage equality is understandable, relatable, and because the solution is relatively straightforward. In this sense, marriage equality has become representative of queer rights to many.

I think there are problems with both extremes. Is it problematic to see queer rights as one-dimensional as marriage equality? Enormously so. But it is also greatly problematic when radical activists, in their attempts to expand the conversation, end up shifting the conversation solely to their concerns and ignore the merits and importance of marriage equality. As a queer youth of color with two moms, I do think that there is a symbolic significance to the issue of marriage equality. I also think that a lot more needs to be done. I want marriage rights to be won because they should be, but also largely so that the queer community can take off their marriage equality blinders and begin legitimately expanding the conversation.

However, until marriage equality is no longer an issue we can talk about, what we need to remember is what has always been at the core of minority movements: solidarity. It is crucial for both extremes to empathize with the other; for everyone to understand the value of a multi-issue queer platform that includes safe schools, job and housing security, immigration rights, hospital rights, tax rights, bullying, homelessness, depression, suicide and marriage equality, among many others. Equality shouldn’t be defined as any one of these movements; it is a gradual and ongoing process that is furthered by the success of each and all of them.

We are all on the same team—we shouldn’t need reminding to stand in solidarity with each other.

 

Youth Spotlight: Rae

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Rae had heard about Outlet, but didn’t come until a friend brought him along to Monday Night Group a year and a half ago. While he was nervous at his first meeting, he has grown to see Outlet as a place where he truly feels safe, can relate to other folks, and maintain respect for differences. Rae has learned a lot in the past two years about himself and the larger community. Since he graduated high school early, Rae has been volunteering with Outlet in the office and has become a regular speaker telling his story in front of classes during our UNIQUE workshops. He recently started attending Outlet’s “Grown Folks” group for young adults to help him transition to college life.

In all settings, he offers compassionate listening as well as gems of wisdom that group participants can relate to. He often gets praise from teachers as well as students for his bravery in sharing his personal coming out story as a transgender youth. Rae can be found sporting a dashing smile at various Outlet events, and sometimes bringing fabulous rainbow colored baked goods too!

Rae thinks “there’s nothing that Outlet needs to improve on”, but when persuaded to think of something, he said Outlet “could be a little bit bigger.” He is looking forward to attending Humboldt State University next fall and while he will miss Outlet, he will continue to learn about gender and sexuality, as well as contribute to communities that share in the values of diverse representation and safety. The advice he would like to give to younger Outlet participants is to “be true to yourself and not let your fear of what others might say hold you back.”

 

Out to Eat!

Mauricio and Oliver on stage at Out to Eat

On Friday, May 3, 2013, supporters of Outlet gathered at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View to celebrate and fundraise for our work empowering LGBTQQ youth and educating the community.

Exciting silent and live auctions, Hors d’oeuvres, desserts and compelling youth speakers combined for a festive and enjoyable evening for an estimated 400 guests, including prominent residents of Silicon Valley and the Mid-Peninsula.

Out to Eat 2013  celebrated 16 years of empowering LGBTQQ youth and educating the community and raised more than $100,000 to support this critical work.

Out to Eat proudly hosted an evening that highlighted and emphasized the community nature of the event.

 

 

Outlet Volunteer Highlight: Tommy!

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Outlet is privileged to work with many adult volunteers each year and we would like to highlight Tommy, an amazing volunteer who shares in his own words below what it means to be involved with Outlet. Enjoy!

Reflection by Tommy: 

I heard about Outlet at age 25 and reached out to see how I could get involved. I was too old to participate as a youth, so I began volunteering. When Anthony Ross interviewed me, I knew I had found a family.

Outlet is not just a haven for the youth; it’s a refuge/safe place for everyone involved – including me. All of the staff and volunteers over the years have been incredible. Anthony has been like an older brother to me. If life called for hot coco and a supportive conversation, Anthony was there. If I needed a hug, Dulce would hold on tight until my worries started to melt away. If I needed to express my frustrations about immigration issues, Rodrigo would lend a supportive ear. If I needed a friendly encouraging smile, Sammy was always there. If I needed a beautiful trans face mirrored back at me, I could turn to Spencer. I do not have enough room to mention all the irreplaceable people that I have met through Outlet who have enriched my life. Thank you to all. Outlet is not just a support group; it is a family.

The only reason I left Outlet after serving for several years is that I have recently been admitted to UC Berkeley. Many of our young adults from the “Grown Folk” group have gone off to colleges this fall as well. Recently I heard from one of the youth and she said, “I still feel pretty lost and not quite settled…Outlet spoiled me! Now I have to go out and make those communities on my own! It’s easy to forget that they aren’t just waiting for you. I thought Smith was some sort of queer heaven, but since it’s assumed, it isn’t discussed and it isn’t an intentional safe space like Outlet.” Her words are spot on. Outlet is unique in that they welcome you right away; they want to support you whether you are exploring your sexual orientation or coming to terms with your gender identity. There is no place like home and Outlet is my home.

Outlet’s Summer Potluck Series

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All three of Outlet’s support-groups came together over the summer for Outlet’s summer potluck series. In promoting cross-group interaction, and a stronger sense of the Outlet community, youth brought smiling enthusiasm paired with anything from homemade guacamole to vibrant rainbow colored cupcakes. The biggest turn out came to the pool  party, in which long time supporters, Naomi Fine and Kathy Levinson, opened their home along with the use of their gorgeous pool. Outlet coordinated with LYRIC to bring down a contingent of San Francisco Queer Youth Interns to create an even larger reach of our queer youth community, and the weather couldn’t have been better for a Summer pool party! Thank you Kathy and Naomi for hosting us! We anticipate continued collaboration and cross-community dialogue, as Outlet launches a Youth Advisory Committee, in which representatives of all support-groups will grow as advocates and widen youth-based leadership within our programming!

“Queermunity”- a video by Outlet youth, Becca!

Outlet Youth and Staff at a potluck

Becca Shipper is an Outlet youth and a freshman at Smith College.  She created Queermunity: Why We Need Safe Spaces, a video for her senior project. In her words, “Queermunity explores the importance of having safe spaces for queer youth, and how Outlet aims to provide that. Outlet is changing the lives of queer youth in the Bay Area by providing support and community.” Enjoy the video!

De Ambiente Leadership Retreat 2012

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De Ambiente youth attended a weekend leadership retreat on September 7-9, 2012 at the YMCA’s Camp Campbell.  Twelve young latinos spent two days and two nights participating in an array of fun and dynamic activities.  The group practiced their leadership and communication skills in the Low Ropes Course and they strengthened their personal confidence in the High Ropes Course.  A night hike with a bonfire and s’mores was the perfect setting for developing deeper bonds within the group. These young men were also trained to be a part of Outlet’s youth Speakers Bureau, increasing their skills and confidence to participate in workshops and panels. This retreat was truly an unique experience that Outlet was able to provide to these young and upcoming leaders thanks to the support of our funders and supporters.  Special thanks go out to the YMCA and particularly the young staff at Camp Campbell for their unconditional support.

De Ambiente at San Francisco Pride 2012

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De Ambiente marched, for a fourth year in a row, with the largest LGBT Latino contingent in history: Latinos de Ambiente del Area de la Bahía (Queer Latinos from the Bay Area) at San Francisco Pride. Adrian, Angel, Daniel, Edgar, Edwin, Mauricio, Neftali, Oliver, Pedro, Oliver, and Richard showed their creativity with the colorful outfits that they created. The contingent that included seven other groups from all over the Bay Area was awarded the  “Absolutely Fabulous Musical Contingent” by the judges and was also nominated for the “The Most Fabulous Contingent Overall”.